1. 12:53 26th Feb 2014

    Notes: 3

    image: Download

    Still Fall of Math prepping…

    Still Fall of Math prepping…

     
  2. 18:29 17th Feb 2014

    Notes: 573

    Reblogged from prostheticknowledge

    prostheticknowledge:

    DATA

    Music video by audio/visual team Wolfshirt is a trippy 3D animation of information travelling in a virtual world.

    The desaturated gifs above do not do the video justice - best watched in smooth colourful HD, video embedded below:

    A visualization of a signal path through a computer.

    Treat yourself to HD.

    Made in Unity, Maya, VDMX, Ableton, Max/MSP and a final edit in Premiere.

    Link

     
  3. 16:42 6th Feb 2014

    Notes: 2120

    Reblogged from monsterbobby

    (Source: yondroid)

     
  4. 13:28 4th Feb 2014

    Notes: 24

    Reblogged from johndelucca

    image: Download

    johndelucca:

Oh damn. It’s the poster Caspar and I did for the Charles Park Trilogy limited box set release. It looks SO HOT!

Oh it’s beautiful…

    johndelucca:

    Oh damn. It’s the poster Caspar and I did for the Charles Park Trilogy limited box set release. It looks SO HOT!

    Oh it’s beautiful…

    (Source: conceptalbum)

     
  5. 13:39 3rd Feb 2014

    Notes: 6

    image: Download

    Loads of Edward Snowden masks being held up while we played Prisms in Moscow.

    Loads of Edward Snowden masks being held up while we played Prisms in Moscow.

     
  6. Symphony of Sirens was performed twice, once in Baku in November 1922 as a celebration of the fifth anniversary of the revolution, and again one year later in Moscow with the support of the State Institute for Musical Science. The instrumentation for the Baku production included “a cast of choirs, … two batteries of artillery guns, a number of infantry regiments including a machine-gun division, hydroplanes, and all the town’s factory sirens”—plus the foghorns of the Soviet navy’s entire Caspian Flotilla, moored in the town’s port. It also involved a special sound machine called the “Magistral,” containing fifty steam whistles played by twenty-five musicians. Avraamov conducted the performance with colored flags from the top of a purpose-built tower.
     
  7. 23:09 20th Dec 2013

    Notes: 1205

    Reblogged from activator-inhibitor

    ryanpanos:

    The Library of Babel | Rice+Lipka Architects | Via

    “The Library of Babel” is a terrifying and beautiful story by prophetic Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, written when he was employed shelving books in the city library. 

    First published in a shorter version as “The Total Library,” this dense, nine-page story concerns a library that houses all of the books ever written and yet to be written. The Library is arranged non-hierarchically; all of the volumes — from the most rudimentary to the most inscrutable — are equally important in this infinite space. Its rooms are hexagons. Its staircases are broken. 

    The Library’s many visitors — elated, dogmatic and anguished types are all represented — strangle one another in the corridors. They fall down air shafts and perish. They weep, or go mad. Desperate characters hide in the bathrooms, “rattling metal disks inside dice cups,” hoping to mind-read the call number for a missing canonical text. Others, overcome with “hygienic, ascetic rage,” stand before entire walls of books, denouncing the volumes, raising their fists. 

     
  8. 00:12 17th Dec 2013

    Notes: 191

    Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia

    image: Download

    jesuisperdu:

[In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout his career, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind.
Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich’s 1968 essay “Music as a Gradual Process,” widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequent essays, articles, and interviews treat Reich’s early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music — African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation — and the influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich’s reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer’s career is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings.
Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recently introduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich’s music in greater depth and perspective.]
[Edited and with an Introduction by Paul Hillier Publisher Oxford University Press, 2002 ISBN 0195354788, 9780195354782 272 pages
Download (EPUB) | Download (Alt link)]

    jesuisperdu:

    [In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout his career, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind.

    Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich’s 1968 essay “Music as a Gradual Process,” widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequent essays, articles, and interviews treat Reich’s early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music — African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation — and the influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich’s reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer’s career is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings.

    Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recently introduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich’s music in greater depth and perspective.]

    [Edited and with an Introduction by Paul Hillier
    Publisher Oxford University Press, 2002
    ISBN 0195354788, 9780195354782
    272 pages

    Download (EPUB) | Download (Alt link)]

     
  9. 00:10

    Notes: 3669

    Reblogged from blowjosh

    image: Download

    (Source: scarymansion)

     
  10. 10:46 15th Dec 2013

    Notes: 5832

    Reblogged from architectureofdoom

    image: Download

    hiromitsu:

stormy day by hugo poon hp on Flickr.